The Last Degree

The Last DegreeIn her book The Last Degree, Dina Rae gives us a fascinating, sometimes frightening glimpse into the inner workings of the secret societies and their evil apocalyptic conspiracy.

This is a very enjoyable book. Normally, I do most of my reading at night, but I’ll admit parts of this book were read in the daytime as the occult and satanic subject matter was keeping me awake.

The Last Degree refers to the highest level of achievement in Freemasonry. As it turns out, at least according to the author, Freemasonry is deeply involved in the occult and is working behind the scenes to implement a “New World Order” under the rule of the devil and his/her followers. Different books from the bible, including Revelations are skillfully interwoven with Freemason mythology and world history to create a seamless apocalyptic scenario.

At first, The Last Degree has elements of a crime story and mystery as detectives and a reporter investigate the murder of the highest ranking Freemason in Chicago. As the story unfolds, Dina Rae expertly adds elements of religion, espionage, war and politics to create a complex and multidimensional world. For this reason, The Last Degree will appeal to a wide variety of readers. Clearly, Dina Rae has considerable knowledge and has done a lot of research in writing this book. Conspiracy buffs will be delighted! From the survivalist compounds in the Smokey Mountains to the intricate details of the Freemason rituals, The Last Degree will keep you in suspense from start to finish. This is a 5 star book that I can easily recommend!

The Falling Skies Season 2 Finale

In the Season 2 Finale of TNT’s alien invasion series Falling Skies, A More Perfect Union, the human resistance has an opportunity to strike at the heart of the alien leadership and to disrupt their operations on the post apocalyptic Earth. The ending is a real cliffhanger with the brief introduction to a new alien species…are they friend or foe? Watch the Falling Skies Season 2 finale on TNT’s website by clicking here or on Amazon instant video through the link below:

 

Falling Skies

falling skies

Hostile aliens now control the planet as Falling Skies enters its second season. TNT has created an enjoyable apocalyptic tv show that follows a large group of refugee survivors as they struggle against their alien invaders. While their intentions are not perfectly clear yet, the aliens of Falling Skies have killed almost all of the adult human population and have made the children into their slaves using some type of parasitic lizard. One of the interesting aspects to this series is that the alien invaders do not consist of one particular type of alien. It seems that there is some type of hierarchy of alien beings that are led by creatures that are similar in appearance to “the greys” that have become the typical portrayal of aliens in our modern civilization. Tom Mason (Noah Wyle), is a former college history professor who lost his wife in the invasion and struggles to raise his 3 children alone in the post apocalyptic landscape while providing some historical perspective and guiding the survivors in their struggle. Falling Skies has plenty of action and while some of the acting is a little overly dramatic, it is your best bet for alien invasion apocalypse and science fiction television this summer.

If you need to catch up on the series, The complete first season is available on DVD through the link below:

The Walking Dead Season 2 Episode 13 Beside the Dying Fire

The greatest post-apocalyptic tv show ever made, AKA, The Walking Dead ends Season 2 with the farm being overtaken by a massive herd of zombies. Along with the farm, our weary group of survivors must abandon any hope that they had for a semi-normal life. While I hate to see the end of Season 2, (it is basically the only show I watch on tv and it gives me something to look forward to on a weekly basis) the season finale does give us a glimpse of what season 3 has in store and it looks excellent! Among other things, we are introduced to a new “kick ass” character and get to see a sneak preview of the group’s new post-apocalyptic safe haven. As with any good show, we are given just enough information in The Walking Dead Season 2 Beside the Dying Fire to keep us coming back for more. It’s a good thing I’m reading World War Z now or I might be going through some type of zombie fighting withdrawal! 😉 Watch the Season 2 Finale of The Walking Dead Beside the Dying Fire through the link below.

Survivors

Survivors is a post-apocalyptic BBC television series spanning two seasons from 2008-2010 that follows a group of people struggling to stay alive after a pandemic kills 99% of the human population. I was able to watch the entire series for free when I signed up for a one month trial membership on Amazon Prime. The virus has spared a select few, with little regard to the moral standing of its victims. The main characters, brought together by chance, have diverse backgrounds, ranging from an escaped prisoner to a previously care free heir to a Kuwaiti oil fortune. This small group of survivors struggles to define their moral boundaries in their quest to stay alive. The necessity of violence is constantly in question. Most of the characters are willing to accept that sometimes violence is necessary, at least in the defense of the innocent. On some level, as humans, aren’t we all complicit to the unspeakable acts that have occurred in the defense of the lives of our ancestors? In Survivors, violence is not a forgone conclusion though, as is often the case. Through their hostile encounters with others, it becomes clear that they will need to fight to survive. Survivors is gentler in a number of ways compared to some of the other apocalyptic fiction that I have reviewed. It is “civil” in many aspects. For instance, there are minimal displays of violence. While danger is always present, violence is used sparingly and not gratuitously. The formation of relationships between the characters remains the focus throughout the development of Survivors. I would recommend the Survivors series. While it is not without its flaws, especially in terms of its realism, I found the characters and their relationships to be interesting and story to be very entertaining.

Hunter After the Fall

Hunter After the Fall, by John Phillip Backus, is a captivating post-apocalyptic adventure that takes place 15 years after an all out worldwide nuclear war has devastated the planet and killed the majority of its human inhabitants. After surviving the war and subsequent nuclear winter, Hunter, a former special forces operative, has made a home for himself in a long abandoned gold mine nestled into the side of a mountain. The rich detail in which Backus describes Hunter’s rocky mountain home creates the sense that Hunter is truly returning to being one with nature. Hunter’s lifestyle is similar to those that lived throughout North America for thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers. Much like the wolves and bears that roam the area, Hunter is deeply connected to the mountain wilderness. He is able to sustain himself from the abundant resources that the rocky mountain ecosystem provides. Hunter is content with his life until the arrival of Elise, who is the daughter of Hunter’s former commanding officer. Elise is sent by her father to find Hunter and to seek his help in the defence of their community of New Eden, which is in danger of being overtaken by an army of bloodthirsty invaders. In an effort to repay his former commanding officer for saving his life in action, before the nuclear war , Hunter is quick to offer his assistance. The story follows the many adventures of Hunter and his counterpart, the strong and beautiful Elise, as they fight to save New Eden. In Hunter, the first book in his After the Fall series, Backus combines a unique blend of Native American shamanism and post-apocalyptic action that makes for a very thought-provoking and thoroughly entertaining story.

The Old Man and the Wasteland

The Old Man and the Wasteland

The Old Man and the Wasteland, written by Nick Cole, follows a man as he searches the wreckage of the post apocalyptic world for “salvage”.

The story is set 40 years after a nuclear attack which has destroyed modern civilization. References to the attack indicate that it was carried out by terrorists and that most of the cities in the US have been destroyed. The characters have minimal information about what happened to the rest of the world, however, the lack of foreign intervention implies that the rest of the world has suffered a similar fate.

The story is told through the Old Man, whose most treasured possession is Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea which is frequently referenced throughout his inner dialogue. In a quest to restore his injured pride, The Old Man travels far outside of the known territory near his village and enters “The Wasteland”. While I can’t comment much on the references to Hemingway’s book, which I haven’t read, The Old Man and the Wasteland is an interesting story with a number of original, or at least renewed ideas. For example, the Old Man stumbles upon messages or hieroglyphs, that survivors have welded into underground steel culverts, as a guide for future civilizations.  My favorite part of the story involves a modern tank versus a “Horde” of primitive, bloodthirsty cannibals which, in itself, makes this book is well worth reading.